Joining Crochet for Beginners

Hi folks 🙂

There are so many ways you can join crochet, as I talked about in this post. This post is all about the nitty gritty of my 3 most used methods.  All are perfect for beginners.

How I Join my crochet by Shelley Husband

dc (sc US) from Back Join

One of the joins I love to use is made using dc (sc US folks)  on the back through both loops of each block.

Here’s how :

Place your blocks right sides together and attach your yarn through the corner stitch of both blocks :

 

Make sure you get the corner on each block

Make sure you get the corner on each block

dc (sc US) through both stitches all the way along including where you joined the yarn :

Make sure you get both loops on each block

Make sure you get both loops on each block

If stitch counts are slightly different on the blocks you are joining, you can easily adjust this join by working a dc (sc US) join the same stitch on one block on the shorter side.  So you work a stitch then work another in the same spot on the short side to a new stitch on the long side :

You can see block on top is slightly shorter than the bottom block. The second pic shows a second stitch being worked into the same place as the last stitch on the front block and a new stitch on the back block.

You can do this several times for each join.  If your blocks are too different though, you will have puckering on your larger block.  There is a limit.  You’ll have to judge what that limit is for you.

A couple of things to note about this join :

  1. When you are joining blocks with the same stitch count, it will look like the one on top has less stitches than the bottom one. It’s all good – trust your stitch counts and it will all work.  It’s because of the way crochet stitches are not symmetrical.

    These blocks have identical stitch counts, but it looks like the on top is a stitch or so short.  Trust it - it will work.

    These blocks have identical stitch counts, but it looks like the on top is a stitch or so short. Trust it – it will work.

  2. This join will create a ridge on the back of the work.  It doesn’t bother me at all as the work sits very flat on the front.

    Joining crochet by Shelley Husband

    Back and front view. You can see that if you used the same colour, the join would blend right in. I have used contrasting colour to good effect though with this method. It all depends on the project.

Why I love it :

It adds a lovely flat border around your squares.  It’s particularly useful when you are joining a lot of different patterns, as you can see in my In a Spin throw.  It subtly separates the differences in the patterns.

In a Spin CAL joined using dc (sc US), right sides together through both loops

In a Spin CAL joined using dc (sc US), right sides together through both loops

It’s also a fast join I find.  I think it works best if you join squares into long strips, then join those long strips.  It’s easy and quick to join each square as you make it.  Not quite “join as you go”, but a similar effect time wise I think.

Sew Together Join from Back Through Both Loops

I am a lover of hand sewing, so it’s no surprise I like doing this.

Depending on the project, I might sew instead of the above method through both loops with right sides facing.

Join to both corners with a yarn needle threaded with a good length of yarn :

Joining crochet by Shelley Husband

Then whip stitch through both loops all the way along :

Go from back to front, all the way along

Go from back to front, all the way along

If you have different stitch counts, the same applies as above.  Sew some stitches along the short block twice, and all stitches along the long side once.

Joining crochet by Shelley Husband

Back view and front view of sewing together through both loops, right sides held together. If done in the same colour as the blocks, it’s pretty well invisible.

Why I love it.

Well, I do like to sew and this is quick and easy.

It’s a super flat join – no ridges, front or back.

It leaves a slightly thinner border than the previous method.

Sew Together Join from Back through Back Loops Only

This is a handy one!  You wouldn’t think there’d be much difference with the last method, but there is.

Hold you blocks right side together, and attach your yarn through the back loops only of the corners of both bocks then whip stitch as above all the way along, but only through the back loops – ie the ones on the outsides.

Joining crochet by Shelley Husband

Here’s where you see the difference – the back is much the same, but the front is different

joining crochet by Shelley Husband

The back view is the same really, but can you see that on the front it looks like the squares are just sitting next to each other almost?

Pulling that thread tight will have a greater effect :

Joining crochet by Shelley Husband

I have successfully joined black squares to white using this method. That’s a win I’d say.

Why I love it

It can be pretty much invisible – great for joining different colours.  I used it for this one :

Yes they are all blue, but some are very light and some very dark.  Worked a treat I'd say.

Yes they are all blue, but some are very light and some very dark. Worked a treat I’d say.

It’s quick and easy. And that’s what you want with a join.  No faffing about.  Just get it done – quick!

It’s super flat.  No chance of a ridge with this one.

So there you go.  Some simple, quick, easy and effective joining methods. Just right for the beginner crocheter.

 

 

8 Comments

  1. Virginia

    Hope one of these will take care of my problem. Will try and see if it works for me or if I have to re do the larger ones.

    Reply
    • Shelley Husband

      Any of them you can use the same technique of using the same stitch a couple of times a few times as you go. Just depends what look you want really which one you choose. Good luck 🙂

      Reply
  2. Sally Burke

    Was pleased to read about you today in the Bluestone Magazine, have been thinking about giving crocheting another try, just never seemed to get the hang of it in the past. Have been looking to see if you have a page that starts you off, you know the one I mean, the one for crochet dummies.
    Will look forward to hearing back from you.
    Regards
    Sally Burke

    Reply
    • Shelley Husband

      Hi Sally 🙂 I do have a real beginner “How to crochet a granny square”. It’s very detailed and has everything you need to know to get started. You can find it here : Good luck!

      Thanks re the Bluestone Mag thing – I was pretty chuffed about that 🙂

      Reply
  3. Pam @ Hooks and Hills

    Thanks for this! I’m new to crochet and hate hand sewing so I’ll be going for option one for my first blanket with joins, currently in progress 🙂

    Reply
    • Shelley Husband

      My pleasure Pam. I’m glad it was useful 🙂 Congrats on your first blanket. I hope it’s the first of many 🙂

      Reply
  4. Debbie

    Hi
    I am looking for a bikini and a halter neck top pattern for my 16 year old daughter.
    Can you make any suggestions please.
    Thanks
    Debbie

    Reply
    • Shelley Husband

      Hi Debbie. Sorry but that’s not something I’ve made or designed. I’m sure you’d be able to find something on Ravelry though. Good luck 🙂

      Reply

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Beyond the Granny Part 4 | spincushions - […]  Start to join your squares.  For good beginner methods of joining, check out this post. It gives you 3 easy options.…
  2. Flowers Abound CAL Joining Options | spincushions - […] have had the same stitch count on the final rounds so far.  That will change with our next block.…
  3. Squaring the Circle Crochet Pattern Tutorial - spincushions - […] I like to join my squares by holding them right sides together and dc (UK) / sc (US) through…

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.